Drive to use standardised components on £600bn Government pipeline

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The Government is pressing for greater use of digital manufacturing techniques to deliver its £600bn project pipeline over the next decade.

Today the government sets out plans to promote a standardisation approach to building infrastructure, which it has called a Platform Approach to Design for Manufacture and Assembly (P-DfMA)

This will see five central departments commit to using standardised and inter-operable components or systems from suppliers across different building types.

Under the plan, a single component or system would be specified where possible in both new schools, hospitals or prison buildings.

Whitehall procurement chiefs argue a common platform approach would capture efficiencies of scale, allowing government to leverage its buying power to accelerate change and innovation in construction.

Chief executive of the Infrastructure and Projects Authority, Tony Meggs said: “Government is the largest client for infrastructure projects so has an important role in using its purchasing power to drive improved productivity in their delivery.

“We recognise there is significant momentum within the sector to scale-up the adoption of more modern and innovative practices and it is the role of the IPA to help coordinate this approach across new infrastructure projects.

“We would like to hear from a range of industry experts on government’s proposals for a Platform Approach to Design for Manufacture and Assembly.”

These fresh proposals will build on Government’s new presumption in favour of offsite construction announced at Autumn Budget 2017.

 

The Government has committed to increasing use of these methods in public-funded projects and today asks for views on how to encourage greater use of these cutting-edge techniques.

It will be underpinned by significant further research to design, test, provide assurance for and develop the components, standards and practices needed.

Private housing is excluded from the scope of the plan although the Ministry for Housing is aiming for similar outcomes in the residential housing market.

The IPA is calling for feedback on the plan. The call for evidence will run for 12 weeks, closing on 17 February.

 

This article was seen first on http://www.constructionenquirer.com/2018/11/26/government-to-use-standardised-components-on-600bn-pipeline/

 

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